Bakewell, Peak District, Derbyshire

Our latest Jolly adventure took us back to the Peak District area, this time to Bakewell.

Beautiful weather and scenery en route to Bakwell

Beautiful weather and scenery en route to Bakewell

Perfect travelling weather. ONWARD!>>>>

Perfect travelling weather.
ONWARD!>>>> ¬†ūüöź

The sun was shining on Jolly

The sun was shining on Jolly ūüėé

The journey was longer than planned, due to delays caused by roadworks in towns we passed through. ¬†We were clock watching as we’d booked the Thornbridge Brewery Tour for 3pm and arrived with very little time to spare after pitching up, etc. ¬†We shot off into town on our bikes and managed to make the majority of the tour so we were happy bunnies. ¬†It was an interesting tour, we learned about the growth of the brewery, the brewing process, and sampled a couple of beers (Jaipur, Bayern & ‘I love you will you marry me’). ¬†We were given a Thornbridge beer glass each too, so they’ll no doubt be well used on our future Jolly journeys. ¬†It’s well worth a visit to both the brewery and the well stocked shop, which are located on the Riverside Business Park half way between the Greenhills Holiday Park we stayed at and Bakewell town centre.

http://www.thornbridgebrewery.co.uk/index.php

Thornbridge Riverside Brewery, Bakewell

Thornbridge Riverside Brewery

The campsite was approx. a mile and a quarter outside the town centre. ¬†It was obviously full at this time of year and in the school holidays, but although quite crowded it wasn’t too noisy. ¬†There is a site bar and shop, and the facilities were adequate, although we didn’t use them as we were off-site the majority of the time and used our onboard facilities when back at base.

http://www.greenhillsholidaypark.co.uk/

The first evening we prepared to sit out beneath a cloudless sky as Suzie was keen to watch the Perseid Meteor Shower. Conditions were perfect. ¬†Unfortunately we were both so tired we couldn’t stay awake til the early hours ended up going to bed! ¬†Fortunately, we had seen a small display of the shower the night before from our garden at home so we didn’t completely miss out on this amazing sight.

Sunset on site

Sunset on site

Pitched up and ready for the Perseid Meteor Shower display ... shortly before Zzzz ...

Pitched up and ready for the Perseid Meteor Shower display … shortly before ūüėī

Bakewell is a picturesque town with quaint courtyards, shops and caf√©s. ¬†It’s situated by the River Wye, and is apparently the only market town within the Peak District National Park boundary. ¬†The first day we were there (Wednesday) it was heaving with traffic and pedestrians, but the next day was much quieter and so easier to explore.

Looking a little at the history of Bakewell, it derived its name from ‘Badeca’s well’, ¬†and almost became a spa town but for the coolness of its springs which were unable to match the warmer temperatures of neighbouring Buxton. ¬† The Bath House, built by the Duke of Rutland in 1697, still stands and retains the original bath in the cellar.¬† It’s probably fair to say, however, that Bakewell is now best known for a confection that came into being in the 19th century when a cook at the Rutland Arms (in the town centre) was supposed to be baking a jam tart but misunderstood the recipe … and, hey presto, the Bakewell Pudding was created! ¬†It seemed only right that we sampled this culinary delight which is an absolute taste sensation! ¬†We brought plenty back with us for family/work colleagues too. ¬†We called into both The Bakewell Pudding Factory and The Old Original Bakewell Pudding Shop for these.

The Bakwell Pudding Factory

The Bakewell Pudding Factory

The Old Original Bakewell Pudding Shop

The Old Original Bakewell Pudding Shop

IMG_7743

A famous Bakewell Pudding

The famous Bakewell Pudding

We spent our second day cycling approx. 24 miles around the local area, which included taking in a return journey along the Monsal Trail. ¬†This is a free public trail for walkers, cyclists and horse riders and was clearly popular with all age groups. ¬†There is cycle hire available if needed, at both the Hassop Station and Blackwell Mill parts of the trail. ¬†It was formerly part of the Midland Railway’s route between Manchester and London and, after being closed for over 40 years, was re-opened following a ¬£2-million restoration scheme. ¬†The trail stretches 8.5 miles between Bakewell and Blackwell Junction near Buxton. ¬†Tunnels, blocked up since the 1960’s have been re-opened, lighting installed and the route resurfaced. ¬†The trail also takes you over impressive viaducts high above the River Wye. ¬†We had been forecast rain but luckily this held off and it was a great afternoon of exercise and sight-seeing. ¬†We loved it. ¬†Very impressive.

Map of the Monsal Trail

Map of the Monsal Trail ūüöī

Start of the Monsal Trail at Bakewell

Start of the Monsal Trail at Bakewell

The Old Bakewell Railway Station

The Old Bakewell Railway Station

Hassop Station

Hassop Station

The old Hassop Station, now a cafe along the trail

The old Hassop Station, now a cafe along the trail

Monsal Dale

Monsal Dale

Entrance to the Monsal Head Tunnel along the Monsal Trail

Entrance to the Monsal Head Tunnel along the Monsal Trail

Bri aka Speedy Gonzales leading us through the tunnel

Bri aka Speedy Gonzales leading us through the tunnel

Bri looking down from the Monsal Head Viaduct

Bri looking down from the Monsal Head Viaduct

Some more views from the viaduct and trail:-

FullSizeRender

Needless to say, after a whole day of cycling, we’d worked up quite an appetite and thirst. ¬†Bakewell has a good choice of pubs and cafes. ¬†Each one we called in at had its own charm and atmosphere, except for The Wheatsheaf, which was sadly lacking anything positive. ¬†Not sure whether it’s in the process of a refurb or always like that. ¬†It was empty too which says a lot.

We decided on a curry for tea and my word what a great little place we found. ¬†The Urban Spoon, Indian Street Kitchen, ticked all the right boxes. ¬†It was a different and exciting menu, the food cooked to perfection. ¬†It is an unlicensed premise so if you want to drink you need to take your own. ¬†We were happy with a couple of tasty mango lassis instead as we’d already sampled a couple of drinks beforehand.

http://urbanspoononline.co.uk/

Full to the brim after a great day, we then cycled back (uphill mostly) to camp to cabin up for the night.

A brilliant couple of days. ¬† Big thumbs up to Bakewell ūüĎć

Our next adventure is to the York Rowntree Caravan Club Site which in the past has been difficult to get booked onto, so we’re looking forward to this one.

ONWARD!>>>>

Suzie & Bri

‘The Gateway to Kinder’ – Hayfield Village, Peak District, Derbyshire

This has been a really interesting trip for us. ¬†We were especially looking forward to this Jolly adventure and it lived up to our expectations. ¬†The weather was reasonably kind, some sunshine and no rain. ¬†Hayfield is a beautiful village in the High Peak area of the Peak District National Park and was one of the locations used for the BBC drama ‘The Village’. ¬†It is also the birthplace of the late actor Arthur Lowe aka Captain Mainwaring in Dad’s Army (one of Bri’s favourites, he’s always watching the repeats!).

We stayed at the Camping & Caravanning Club Site just a short walk from the village Рapproximately 15 minutes along the stream that runs alongside the site.  The staff are helpful, guiding you onto the site and allowing you to choose your own pitch.  We were mid-week on this trip so had plenty to choose from and got a nice sun spot.

http://www.campingandcaravanningclub.co.uk/campsites/uk/derbyshire/highpeak/hayfield

Hayfield Camping & Caravanning Club Site

Hayfield Camping & Caravanning Club Site

We enjoyed a little time on site before venturing out. ¬†There’s a little piece of history right on the doorstep of this site that’s worth a visit. ¬†It’s opposite the site entrance, across the main road, in Bowden Bridge car park. ¬†It’s an old quarry and the site of the Kinder Scout Mass Trespass of 1932 when around 500 walkers, mostly from Manchester, trespassed en masse and walked from Hayfield to Kinder Scout to secure access rights to open country for all to enjoy forever.

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/dark-peak/things-to-see-and-do/view-page/item615841/

Commemorative plaque of the Kinder Scout Mass Trespass of 1932, on the quarry wall

Commemorative plaque of the Kinder Scout Mass Trespass of 1932, on the quarry wall

Commemorative bench near the wall plaque

Commemorative bench near the wall plaque

After visiting the old quarry, we called into The Sportsman pub for tea but ended up only having one drink. ¬†We decided not to eat there so can’t comment on the food. ¬†We sat out in the rear beer garden which was tired looking and overgrown, with log furniture that was falling apart and had rusty screws protruding in places. ¬†We’d previously heard it was a good place to visit but apparently the pub is currently awaiting new management so hopefully it’ll get the tlc it needs and regain it’s appeal. ¬†We cycled further down into the village instead, and ate at the Pack Horse Inn. ¬†It’s located in the centre of the village and serves excellent food. ¬†In fact, considering the size of the village, Hayfield is very well served with a good choice of pubs. ¬†Others include: The Royal Hotel, The George Hotel, Kinder Lodge and The Roundhouse. ¬†Needless to say, we popped our heads into most during our trip ūüôā

Main road down from site to village

Main road (Kinder Road) down from site to village

On the way into village you pass the beginning of the start of the 267 mile Pennine Way walk which runs up to the Scottish Borders

The Pack Horse Inn, Hayfield

The Pack Horse Inn, Hayfield

The 16th Century George Hotel, Hayfield

The 16th Century George Hotel, Hayfield

While walking through the village it was easy to spot some locations used in the BBC drama ‘The Village’.

The village store viewed from the alleyway that leads to the pub - all used in the BBC drama 'The Village'

The village store viewed from the alleyway that leads to the pub – both used in the BBC drama ‘The Village’

Alleyway down from the main road with the fictional pub entrance on the left

Alleyway down from the main road with the fictional ‘Lamb Inn’ pub entrance on the left

Bri outside the village store

Suzie outside the village store

Hayfield village church and war memorial

Hayfield village church and war memorial

We also visited the late actor Arthur Lowe’s birthplace which is on Kinder Road itself. ¬†We spoke to a friendly neighbour there who informed us that the house with the blue plaque on wasn’t actually where he was born. ¬†He was apparently born at his grandparent’s house next door, lived there for 3 days, then moved with his parents to the house with the plaque on. ¬†So there you go!

Blue plaque at Dad's Army actor Arthur Lowe's birthplace

Blue plaque at Dad’s Army actor Arthur Lowe’s childhood home

For walking fans, Hayfield offers a challenging circular walk up to the moorland plateau that is Kinder Scout, standing around 600 metres above sea level.  It will take approx. 4-6 hours.  The walk begins at Bowden Bridge car park.

http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2012/may/12/kinder-scout-derbyshire-walk

Instead we decided to visit the town of New Mills, cycling along the Sett Valley Trail. ¬†It’s just 2.5 miles to New Mills where you can then proceed on foot through the Torrs Riverside Park to get to the spectacular Millennium Walkway that runs high above the River Goyt. ¬†The walkway is suspended from the side of a gorge and runs around the ruins of the old Torr Mill.

Along the Sett Valley Trail

Along the Sett Valley Trail

View of Kinder Scout from along the Sett Valley Trail

View of Kinder Scout from along the Sett Valley Trail

Brunch stop at the cute little Sett Valley Cafe, Birch Vale

Brunch stop at the cute little Sett Valley Cafe, Birch Vale

Ruins of Torr Mill in New Mills

Ruins of Torr Mill in New Mills

Weir at Torr Mill

Weir at Torr Mill

Lovely spot for some photography

Lovely spot for some photography

Bottoms up!

Bottoms up!

Millennium Walkway, New Mills

Millennium Walkway, New Mills

Millennium Walkway

Ahh, look at that smile ūüôā ūüôā

Memorial plaque to the man responsible for construction of The Millennium Walkway, who tragically died in the London bombings in 2005

Memorial plaque to the man responsible for construction of The Millennium Walkway, who tragically died in the 7/7 London bombings in 2005

We finished the day off by cycling up to Little Hayfield to visit the Lantern Pike Inn, and had built up quite a thirst and appetite by then. ¬†The pub houses some Corrie memorabilia, not least the original glass doors of the Rover’s Return. ¬†Pat Phoenix (Elsie Tanner) and Tony Warren (writer) both lived in Little Hayfield for a while. ¬†It is also said that Tony Warren wrote the very first Corrie episodes in this pub *gasp* so this was a MUST visit for us two Corrie addicts!

http://www.lanternpikeinn.co.uk/

The Lantern Pike Inn, Little Hayfield

The Lantern Pike Inn, Little Hayfield

Cosy, welcoming pub

Cosy, welcoming pub

Can't believe I actually walked up close to read this carefully!

Can’t believe I actually walked up close to read this carefully!

Excellent pub grub

Good, tasty pub grub

Corrie memorabilia

Corrie memorabilia

Bri aka The Corrie King of Kirkham in Corrie corner heaven

Bri aka The Corrie King of Kirkham in Corrie corner heaven

Suzie, the second biggest Corrie fan!

Suzie, the second biggest Corrie fan!

We chose a good night to visit too (Monday) when a group of local musicians meet and play together in the pub. It was a great atmosphere and entertainment, so much so that we ended up staying a couple of hours longer than originally planned, before heading back to site in the dark to cabin up for the night.

Great break. ¬†Bring on the next one, when we’re back in the Peak District to visit Bakewell, home of the tart. ¬†Don’t you comment Bri!

ONWARD!>>>>

Suzie & Bri

Segway Experience at Ripley Castle, North Yorkshire

We’d been looking forward to this trip for some time, keen to try out the current craze that is Segway. ¬†Suzie bought this last December for Bri’s birthday and we thought we’d book it somewhere we could incorporate another Jolly jaunt. ¬†Any excuse. So we chose Ripley in North Yorkshire.

We stayed at the Ripley Caravan Park, a Listed Site (LS) with the Camping & Caravanning Club but not under their jurisdiction.  As with many private sites, we have discovered a personal preference for using them mid-week/out of holiday seasons for a quieter experience, because come Friday mornings the sites literally take on a whole new look and ambience.  We thoroughly enjoyed our stay here, only just touching on the weekend.  They cater well for families too, with a playground and a swimming pool on site.

We spent the first afternoon of our break relaxing on site when the sun made an occasional appearance, then walked into Ripley (10 mins) using the public footpath which is accessed by walking back to the site entrance where there is a gate on the right, walking through the field, across two roads at the roundabout, and along the footpath into the village. ¬†It’s the best route to avoid the busy main road from site.

Sunset over the fields on the walk back to site

Sunset over the fields on the walk back to site

Ripley is described as one of the most picturesque villages in Yorkshire and is located just a few miles north of Harrogate. It is apparently based on a french model village with unique architecture. ¬†There are¬†food shops, a local farm shop, ice-cream parlour, Post Office, florist, and an Art Gallery. ¬†The main attraction and focal point of Ripley, however, is the historic Ripley Castle, home to the Ingilby family for 700 years. ¬†It’s a must to visit if in the area and offers a wide array of activities for all.

http://www.ripleycastle.co.uk/

Ripley Castle and grounds

Ripley Castle and grounds

Ripley Castle

Ripley Castle

Sir Thomas Ingleby (c1290-1352) married the heiress Edeline Thwenge in 1308/9 and acquired the Ripley Castle estate with its medieval manor house as her dowry. His oldest son, also called Thomas (1310-1369), saved the King from being gored by a wild boar whilst on a hunting expedition and was knighted in return with the boar’s head symbol as his crest.

Hence the name of the sole pub in the village, The Boar’s Head, where we ate on both nights. ¬†It’s an old Coaching Inn that is part of the Ripley Castle Estate and listed as one of the great Inns of Britain. ¬†We were not disappointed. ¬†Although not the most extensive menu, the food is made using fresh produce from the Castle kitchen gardens where possible, and is deeeelicious.

Chef returning with fresh produce from the Castle

Chef returning to the Inn with a basket of fresh produce from the Castle

There is a short history written above the bar, describing previous pubs in Ripley village – apparently there were once 3 pubs, until their closure and a period of 70 years sobriety (sad times!) until the re-opening of the Boar’s Head (Hallelujah!).

http://www.boarsheadripley.co.uk/

The Boar's Head, Ripley Castle

The Boar’s Head, Ripley Castle

Fancy forgetting our sunglasses.  Doh!  *face palm*

Fancy forgetting our sunglasses. Doh!
*face palm*

Between us, we made a right old mess of this Eton Mess at the Boar's Head Inn.  Yum!

Between us, we made a right old mess of this Eton Mess at the Boar’s Head Inn. Yum!

The first evening it was warm enough to eat outside in the sunshine and we got into conversation with a couple from the North East, the female of which informed us that she was a white witch.  We then spoke at length about her experiences.  It was quite a bizarre conversation at times but quite interesting nonetheless.  She was also quite interested to learn that Suzie hails from Clitheroe in Pendle Witch country!

During our visit we called into the local All Saints Church directly opposite the Boar’s Head Inn, ¬†There’s an interesting history to the church which contains the Ingilby family vault and tombs of certain other local people of note. ¬†We¬†each lit a candle and had a moment’s quiet reflection. ¬†It’s all too easy sometimes to walk past such wonderful buildings and we often like to take some time to do this on our travels.

http://www.allsaintsripley.org/

All Saints Church, Ripley

All Saints Church, Ripley

As mentioned, we had booked a Segway experience (through Segway Events) and thought the Ripley Castle setting would make it extra special. ¬†Beforehand we had a little wander, saw a wedding taking place in this stunning setting and had lunch at the castle cafe before our activity. ¬†We enjoyed a Ripley Platter and Bri particularly enjoyed the beer they served here – ‘Crackshot Ale’ by Daleside Brewery.

http://www.dalesidebrewery.co.uk/home.html

A Ripley Platter for two and a bottle of Daleside 'Crack Shot' a 17th Century Ale

A Ripley Platter for two and a bottle of Daleside ‘Crack Shot’ a 17th Century Ale

It was a fab experience and one we’ll definitely try again because once you find your feet/wheels, it just doesn’t feel you’ve long enough to play on them! ¬†The training was given by Josh who was very friendly and informal, followed by a ride down to a field to take part in some friendly team competitions involving various tricks and skills training. ¬†After that we rode up to a track and were left to have our own little ride around. ¬†Unfortunately by that time, we only had about 5 minutes to enjoy testing our new found skills before our hour was up. ¬†A few people expressed disappointment at this. ¬†Maybe less time on the team comps and more free time would’ve been a better experience but it was still a great introduction to Segway.

Bri:

Bri: “Look, no hands!”

Suzie showing off her one handed slalom skills!

Suzie showing off her one handed slalom skills!

The group's response to

The group’s response to “Who’s going to fall off first?” ¬†Luckily nobody did!
Good group, great fun ūüôā

Another fabulous local adventure. ¬†It’s amazing how many places there are to discover just a couple of hours from home and we’re loving exploring as many as possible until such a time as work and responsibilities allow us to venture further afield to explore more of the UK, Ireland, and Europe.

Our next adventure is to Hayfield in Derbyshire, birthplace of one of Bri’s favourite TV personalities and characters – Arthur Lowe aka Captain Mainwaring of Dad’s Army. ¬†I think Bri’s affection for this programme stems from some of his experiences during his time managing his local retained fire station for nearly 30 years! Haha.

*Cpt. Mainwaring voice*  YOU STUPID BOY!

ONWARD!>>>>

Suzie & Bri